Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Quick question - Linksys WRT54G

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    56
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Quick question - Linksys WRT54G

    Hey, have a quick question.. As you will realize, this is not really my area of expertise, but how do I set a WEP key for my router?

    Everytime I enter something in the Passphrase slot under Wireless Security, it generates 4 different keys.

    I want to be able to, rather need to be able to set the WEP key to what I will remember.


    Help pleaase
    Device: BlackBerry® Bold 9700, v6.0.0.499
    PIN: 2261952B, Powered by LIME 3G

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,954
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    WEP is not really secure. Its better to use WPA2 with AES as the encryption.
    MATADOR: GIGABYTE GA-EP45-UD3R, C2Q Q9400 @ 3.4GHz, ZALMAN CNPS9500, 6GB GSkill, Crucial C300 SSD 128GB, 2x 2TB WD Caviar Black, Diamond HD5850, 2x Plextor DVD+RW, RAIDMAX Scoprio 668WBP Case, Rosewill Xtreme Series RX850-D-B 850W, Dell E228FP WideScreen 22", Logitech Z-2300, Windows 7 Pro x64

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    785
    Rep Power
    0

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    5,121
    Rep Power
    24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RZA View Post
    WEP is not really secure. Its better to use WPA2 with AES as the encryption.
    Quote Originally Posted by techie2000 View Post
    Both persons who posted before me (above) have put good stuff up. If you insist on WEP then you need to note that WEP uses hex. This means that your key has to be A-F and 0-9. Depending on your type of WEP then the number of characters you need differ.

    To make your life easier - just go with WPA/WPA2. That way you can set it to a password that you will remember.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wired_Equivalent_Privacy

    A 64-bit WEP key is usually entered as a string of 10 hexadecimal (base 16) characters (0-9 and A-F). Each character represents four bits, 10 digits of four bits each gives 40 bits; adding the 24-bit IV produces the complete 64-bit WEP key. Most devices also allow the user to enter the key as five ASCII characters, each of which is turned into eight bits using the character's byte value in ASCII; however, this restricts each byte to be a printable ASCII character, which is only a small fraction of possible byte values, greatly reducing the space of possible keys.

    A 128-bit WEP key is usually entered as a string of 26 hexadecimal characters. 26 digits of four bits each gives 104 bits; adding the 24-bit IV produces the complete 128-bit WEP key. Most devices also allow the user to enter it as 13 ASCII characters.

    A 256-bit WEP system is available from some vendors. As with the other WEP-variants 24 bits of that is for the IV, leaving 232 bits for actual protection. These 232 bits are typically entered as 58 hexadecimal characters. ((58 × 4 bits =) 232 bits) + 24 IV bits = 256-bit WEP key.
    Quote Originally Posted by jmccullock View Post
    Everytime I enter something in the Passphrase slot under Wireless Security, it generates 4 different keys.
    What the router does is take a phrase you know and hash it to give you the different keys. If you always use the same phrase you'll always get the same keys. Once you change a character (or the case sometimes) the digits in the keys will change.
    Last edited by khat17; May 8, 2012 at 07:07 PM.
    Knowing the solution doesn't mean knowing the method. Yet answering correctly and regurgitation are considered "learning" and "knowledge".

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •