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Thread: (Layman Science Series) Week 2 - Why is the center of the earth so hot?

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    Default (Layman Science Series) Week 2 - Why is the center of the earth so hot?

    Intro
    I am trying to post a science/physics question of varying difficulty each week for this year.

    The Rules are:
    Answers must be complete, and each statement must be sound/logical.
    The better the answer, then the more points awarded. Answers can always be updated at anytime as
    we learn something new everyday.
    The greater the difficulty, the greater the points. I will give an answer at end of week. Repeating my
    answer awards no points, you will have to come with a better or alternate answer.

    Question
    Why is the center of the earth so hot? Assume that the earth started out as a rogue planet from deep space that got caught in the sun's gravity

    Difficulty
    A-Level Physics
    A-Level Geology

    Site share of the week
    Real Engineering - YouTube
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCR1...6UEA_zQ81kwXfg
    Be respectful, but don't follow in the path of idiot.

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    Interesting concept. And not thrown outward from the BBT? Hmm....

    Alright. Let's say our sun is fairly new and Earth got caught in the gravitational pull while being thrown nearby. This would then say that Earth was a planetoid of sorts that had an existing core. The rotation balancing act by the core versus the planet's rotation - with just the right distance from the sun - then would have allowed for life to form. If we consider that some bacteria may be found on other planets, it's not outlandish to think that we would have then evolved from tardigrades. I just wish we had retained the "Duncan MacLeod" ability.

    All in theory. Not an evolutionist. For discussion purposes.

    Hopefully not too much info, but enough to get persons thinking.
    Knowing the solution doesn't mean knowing the method. Yet answering correctly and regurgitation are considered "learning" and "knowledge".

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    Alright. Let's say our sun is fairly new and Earth got caught in the gravitational pull while being thrown nearby. This would then say that Earth was a planetoid of sorts that had an existing core. The rotation balancing act by the core versus the planet's rotation - with just the right distance from the sun - then would have allowed for life to form. If we consider that some bacteria may be found on other planets, it's not outlandish to think that we would have then evolved from tardigrades. I just wish we had retained the "Duncan MacLeod" ability.
    Lol
    However, It probable would not be nice traveling tru deep space without sufficient food .

    Actual the question is still in keeping with the Big Bang Theory
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rogue_planet
    A rogue planet (also termed a free-floating (FFP), interstellar, nomad, orphan, sunless, starless, unbound or wandering planet) is an interstellar object of planetary-mass, therefore smaller than fusors (stars and brown dwarfs) and without a host planetary system. Such objects have been ejected from the planetary system in which they formed or have never been gravitationally bound to any star or brown dwarf.[1][2][3] The Milky Way alone may have billions to trillions of rogue planets, a range the upcoming Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will likely be able to narrow down.[4][5]
    As far as we know Earth could be, but I am not saying it is. We just don't know. I think the common theory is that it is not. However the Earth does not fully match the typical composition and size at this orbit. We just don't know. However the point here is to theorize in a logical step by step approach.

    A planet can leave a solar system if solar "gravity" or "planetary angular moment" changes to some degree.

    There are high energy comets, and asteroids which can knock a planet. Even a comet passing near to a planet can transfer its kinetic energy to a planet, called orbital sling shot. I think the theory was awarded a Nobel Prize, and it is a technique NASA use to get more kinetic energy to launch crafts. If you maths it out correctly, a craft can get slingshot at a higher velocity as it passes a gravitational body moving in it orbit. As the crafts get near, the body pulls the craft (gravitationally and along its own orbit), but the craft should have enough velocity to curve and not fall to the body.

    Stars loosing energy/mass change their gravitation pull. Explosions create a push outwards to destabilize orbits (probable obliterate planets to molten pieces. It depends). This may cause rouge planets (or rouge molten asteroids which then sphere up, radiates and cools).

    Finally, a rogue planet or object that is moving in (almost) a straight line will get caught in an orbit (spiral to a stable orbit) of a star (or other big body) if its Newtonian velocity causes its increasing centripetal force to match the gravitational force of the solar system it enters. Otherwise it will just curve and escape, or spiral towards the star (In Einsteinian terms, the space time bending becomes circular at that speed when it enters the solar system.)

    Even though earth's orbit is stable right now, the galaxy is dynamic at greater time scales.

    Assuming "Earth was a rogue planet" is just to get a starting point that "it would be cold" since it would have radiated its heat. Thus the question now is "why is the core hot?" using just A-Level Physics and Geology
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    https://www.discovermagazine.com/pla...of-earths-core

    By duplicating the extreme heat and pressure at the Earth’s core, a European research team has determined that the temperature of the center of our planet is close to 11,000 degrees Fahrenheit — nearly 2,000 degrees hotter than previously thought.

    Earth’s solid inner core is surrounded by a fluid outer core, with the boundary between the two expected to be the temperature of the melting point of highly pressurized iron — the primary ingredient of both layers. Researchers placed a speck of iron between two small conical diamonds and applied laser-beam heat and 200 gigapascals of pressure. As the iron changed from solid to molten, they measured the temperature by noting a change in how X-rays were diffracted — a faster, more precise method than the simple visual techniques used in older experiments.

    Knowing Earth’s core temperature is key to understanding the planet’s internal processes, particularly its magnetic field and geothermal activity, explains research team leader Simone Anzellini of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission.
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    Still waiting on more details on this. Been a bit on the sick side - flu - and recovering. Not as active as a result especially when you still have work to do.
    Knowing the solution doesn't mean knowing the method. Yet answering correctly and regurgitation are considered "learning" and "knowledge".

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