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Thread: Power Supply Units Explained.

  1. #21
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    Thumbs up Wattage Calculator

    Gentlemen,

    For those of you contemplating the purchase of a power supply, you can use NewEgg's Wattage Calculator.

    Simply select the devices that you want to run as well as the number of those devices you intend to have in your system. It is VERY accurate and should give you a ball park figure as to the wattage rating of an adequate power supply. Get a PSU that is about 50 watts higher than whatever wattage rating you get. The reason for this is to compensate for any additional components (read: bells & whistles) that you might want to add to your case later on (like fans, water cooling, etc.).

    Please continue to submit corrections and additions. I have a few to make myself. When I return later this eve, I'll make a summation.

    Thanks agin.

  2. #22
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    MODS.... this deserves a STICKY

    19" LCD|Asus A8N SLI Deluxe|AMD X2 3800+ @ 2.5GHz Cooled by Zalman CNPS9500|4 x GSkill 1Gb DDR 400|2.25 TB Total storage|eVGA 256mb 8600GT DDR3 @ 640/1600MHz cooled by ZalmanVF700|Ultra X-Finity 600W PSU w/ 135mm fan|1 x 120mm|4 x 80mm|Altec Lansing AC56|Windows7 x64 : Ultimate

  3. #23
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    also dont forget teh efecta of aging on capactiors

  4. #24
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    this may explain everytime i try to turn up the graphics above low in crysis on my 8800gts i get a black screen and have to reboot. i need to check my psu when i get home. so what psu do u guys recommend?
    ChAos AnD cOnfLicT ArE mY ParEntS

  5. #25
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    generic or "name brand"?

  6. #26
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    i am interested in this one what do you think of it

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817139002

  7. #27
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    corsair looks like it makes good psu. But they cost money. That looks good and i wish i could afford it. THink most ppl when building a complete system skimp on the psu cause its effect on performance isn't too obvious. Rather a faster proc than a more expensive PSU.

    A review - http://www.jonnyguru.com/review_details.php?id=32

    anyway. any opinions on this PSU http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817182088 ?
    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    You assume all risk for your use. 2006 Azix Solutions.
    All rights reserved.

    Dropbox: http://db.tt/8qVS35lo

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Electrotechnic View Post
    MODS.... this deserves a STICKY
    Didn't you see it in the Sticky from long time?
    The trouble with learning from experience
    is that the test comes first and
    the lesson afterwards

  9. #29
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    this is what it says in the manual for my power supply. I currently have 3 sata HD, 2 dvd burners and a xfx 8800gts. it look like ma machine so burn up. oh well
    ChAos AnD cOnfLicT ArE mY ParEntS

  10. #30
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    Exclamation Errata and Addenda

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidJa View Post
    ...both statements are slightly misleading as the amp requirement is for total system requirement...
    Myth #6: The Amp rating on a GPU box shows the rating of the entire power consumption requirement of the CPU, and not the GPU alone.

    There are several reasons why this is a myth (and an unfortunately popular one at that):
    1. There's no way that a GPU manufacturer could possibly determine the summative amperage requirements on a 12v rail in any given system configuration that includes their GPU without running through every possible permutation of Processor+Cooler+GPU+Motherboard there is at the time of manufacture. So how would they know which core CPU components + their GPU would need to draw 30 amp for the thing to work properly? Don't forget that some motherboards+CPUs draw more current than others. I'm speaking with specific reference to the Quad-Core and Extreme processors from Intel and their cousins in the AMD flavours. With that said...

    2. The amp requirements on the box stipulate the amp draw by the GPU at MAXIMUM load. The odds of an application pushing a GPU that hard is directly proportional to Moore's Law. However, a standard multi-rail PSU will carry a high end GPU just fine - until a game comes along that pushes it hard enough to cause the PSU to drop out. Just because the PCI-E lane is only supplied 75 watts/card, it doesn't mean that the card can't draw more power. That's the whole point of building power supplies with bigger wattage ratings, and that's why some people have gone as far as to get TWO power supplies to keep their SLI rig alive during the most demanding games. An SLI brown out on the PCI-E lane is not uncommon. Some computers simply bow out and lockdown once the AMP requirement on the PCI-E lane goes above the 240 VA rating on a specific 12v rail. If you want to risk it, that's your choice. Crysis will be the proof of how good your PSU really is.

    3. Only one power supply unit is known to merge amperage on multiple rails to supply shifting power demand, and that's the Mushkin HP-580AP 580 watt, 4 rail PSU. I would recommend this PSU to anyone running high end GPU's who can't find a single rail PSU with the amperage they need for a maximum draw on a single 12v rail. If you hurry, you can get it for a steal on NewEgg for only $99.99 with free 3-day shipping. I'd also recommend it to people who love green LEDs. It's nice. Plus, it's a modular PSU, and that's the best of the very best there is. GO FOR IT!





    Mushkin HP-580AP

    Gentlemen, please observe:



    If you look carefully at the top of this card towards the right edge, you will note that this 8800GTX has two (not one), but TWO PCI-E 6-pin power ports. Why do you think this is? I'll tell you:

    If you happen to be running a SLI capable PSU, it will have at least 2 6-pin PCI-E connectors. There's a very good reason for this. In the event that your PSU is of the multi-rail 12v flavour, it is highly likely that each rail will be able to carry the total 30 amp requirement to power this bad boy at full load (unless it's a Mushkin PSU which features rail-fusion). That's why you have TWO 6-pin PCI-E connectors, so that you can merge the amperage from two 12v rails on the one GPU. If you're running a single rail PSU which has all the amperage needed on the one rail, then one 6-pin PCI-E power connector will suffice.

    If you're going to be running a full SLI or Crossfire rig, like this:



    ...then getting a truly monster PSU with up to 4 PCI-E connectors for two 8800GTX cards is strongly recommended. Those PSUs start at roughly 750 watts, and carry a total summation of at least 60 amps across a 12v rail. Here's one of them:


    SILVERSTONE DA750 ATX12V (Click image for details)

    Please note, that's a single rail PSU - which I highly recommend over multi-rails for high end GPUs. Corsair also makes very good (and extremely quiet!) PSUs in this spec range. So I highly recommend those too - if you can afford them.

    However, to be completely balanced, most games DO NOT REQUIRE THIS KIND OF LOAD ......yet. nVidia is just preparing the market for some truly monster software that is yet to come (or is it already here?).

    [Cont'd...]

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