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Thread: Power Supply Units Explained.

  1. #121
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    take it from.... me my older gts250 killed bout 5 of those same cheap PSUs in less than a month (though it was OC'ed). its not wise to trust your high end merchandise to those low end PSUs....its better you crank out 1 big money to get a decent PSU than to be buying one every week

  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flexx17 View Post
    take it from.... me my older gts250 killed bout 5 of those same cheap PSUs in less than a month (though it was OC'ed). its not wise to trust your high end merchandise to those low end PSUs....its better you crank out 1 big money to get a decent PSU than to be buying one every week
    Well Flexx from yuh said yuh OC'ed then that says a lot lol. I bet yuh is not the card alone yuh overclocked.

    Remember my rig is kinda a low-mid range one right now, and as I said I not overclocking this card on t his current rig I got.
    Current Android - HTC One M9+
    PC Specs - Motherboard: Asus Z77 -A | Processor: Intel Core i5-3570K (Overclocked to 4.4 ghz) | Memory: 2x 4gig Corsair Vengeance DDR3 @ 1600mhz | Video Card: Asus Strix GTX 970 (1400+mhz O.C) | Monitor: Asus VG248QE 24" 144hz HD/3D | Steam ID --> Powpow

  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Powpow View Post
    Well Flexx from yuh said yuh OC'ed then that says a lot lol. I bet yuh is not the card alone yuh overclocked.

    Remember my rig is kinda a low-mid range one right now, and as I said I not overclocking this card on t his current rig I got.
    that rig was pretty much same specs like yours

    originally it was:
    CPU- q9650 but it died (long story) so at that time i had in a P4 HT OC'ed to 3.6ghz
    2gb DDR3 ram
    MSI G41M-P33 Board
    GTS 250
    1tb WD HDD

    but as you said yeah lol pretty much everything was OC'ed

  4. #124
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    Well I got the card last week and so far it's running great. Was having some temperature issues when using "Need for Speed the Run" to test it out. Went up to about 80 degrees celcius and did some research and found out that the fan speed could be increased lol.

    Brought the speed up to about 50% and also did some cable managment and in "Mass Effect" getting temps of about 50-61 degrees celsius. Considering this is a stocked OC card I guess this is the normal temperature range for this type of card.

    The power supply I posted ealier is working good so far with the card and the other monitor I got, so I got two(2) monitors running on it now and having no issues. Plan to get a better power supply eventually though to be on the safe side.
    Current Android - HTC One M9+
    PC Specs - Motherboard: Asus Z77 -A | Processor: Intel Core i5-3570K (Overclocked to 4.4 ghz) | Memory: 2x 4gig Corsair Vengeance DDR3 @ 1600mhz | Video Card: Asus Strix GTX 970 (1400+mhz O.C) | Monitor: Asus VG248QE 24" 144hz HD/3D | Steam ID --> Powpow

  5. #125
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    Great write up Xeno.
    AMD FX 8150 @ 4.2Ghz | MSI 970A-G46 | 8GB DDR3 Corsair Vengeance | XFX Radeon 6850| 19" Acer AL1916W | Western Digital Raptor 160GB 10,000RPM 16MB | 2 x Seagate Barracuda 1TB | 1 x SAMSUNG 750GB | CoolerMaster HAF 932 | Cooler Master Extreme 2 525 | Klipsch ProMedia 5.1 THX 500Watts

  6. #126
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    Here's a website that you can use for more information on the amount and type of power supply you might want to use for a particular build:

    http://www.squidoo.com/best-psu-power-supply

    It also recommends this PSU calculator to help in the decision so give it a try:

    http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/Power
    Current Android - HTC One M9+
    PC Specs - Motherboard: Asus Z77 -A | Processor: Intel Core i5-3570K (Overclocked to 4.4 ghz) | Memory: 2x 4gig Corsair Vengeance DDR3 @ 1600mhz | Video Card: Asus Strix GTX 970 (1400+mhz O.C) | Monitor: Asus VG248QE 24" 144hz HD/3D | Steam ID --> Powpow

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    Really Worked. Helpful. Mad Move.
    Quote Originally Posted by Xenocrates View Post
    Power Supply Units, Explained
    Xenocrates, contributor

    Based on discussions in a previous thread, I realised that a number of us still don't fully understand a computer's power supply unit, which is by far the single most component in your rig. Concordantly, consider this a quick crash course in electronics, after which I'll move on to specifics about computer power supplies. If you are a do-it-yourself builder, build machines for a living, or otherwise tinker with your own hardware, this thread is for you. UTECH Comp. Sci. students should already know much of this stuff. Never-the-less, a refresher course never killed anyone.

    Ok, let's learn about some basic priciples of electronics that you need to understand before you can make sense of anything else in this article:
    • Voltage - Is the measure of the potential to produce an electrical current between the highest and lowest differential in an electrical circuit. The wider the differential, the greater the voltage and thus the greater the amount of burst electricity that is produced.

      Electricity is measured in volts. A cathode and an Anode are both a simple example of a differential circuit. An electrical circuit creates this differential using capacitors, resistors, diodes and other components of which it is comprised. The spark produced between differentials in a circuit is a certain number of volts (denoted ##v, e.g. 12v or 12 volts), depending on the differential in the electrons on either node inside the circuit. Your power supply is rigged to produce a fixed differential on various circuits that exist inside it. There are usually about 5 differential circuits in a power supply unit which cater to specific components on your motherboard. But before you can understand that, you need to appreciate something else:

    • Amperage - Also known as "Current" Is the rate of flow of electrons between two differentials. Note the subtle difference between amperage and voltage. Current is measured in amperes (or Amps for short). It is denoted on your power supply as ##a, for example: 18a = 18 amps. Every circuit in your powersupply produces a specific voltage at a certain number of amps. Think of amps as the speed of electricity and voltage as the volume. When a certain volume of electricity (volts) travels at a certain speed (amps), you get:

    • Wattage - Which is also known as "Power". Wattage = Volts x Amps. So when a power supply is rated as 500 Watts, it is the voltage of each circuit inside the power supply multiplied by their individual amp ratings. Each circuit inside a power supply produces what is known as a:

    • Rail - Every power supply carries anywhere from 4 to as many as 9 rails. Each rail is rated for a specific voltage, and will always carry that voltage no matter how many devices are connected to it. However, each rail has an AMPERE RATING. The more devices you connect to each rail, the lower the available amperage to the rest of your computer system on that specific rail. I'll explain the significance of this in just a bit. But first, you need to understand how volts and amps work.


    [Cont'd...]

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