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Thread: Customer Support Feedback

  1. #1
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    Default Customer Support Feedback

    Topic doesn't suggest hardware I know. But bear with me for a few. Skip to the 5th paragraph for the hardware details.

    I had a death in my family recently and the things leading up to the funeral made my freelance work suffer. The 9-5 had to take priority as it pays for everything.

    I moved hosting providers and started to review old tickets. Get rid of old machines and make contact with clients that had open tickets to ensure things were resolved, or move towards resolution.

    One client replied that the original issue was not resolved. I realize now that part of the problem is the client isn't tech savvy enough to realize that antivirus updates need to be done whenever the AV company releases an update. You don't just update once and never need to again.

    Now that the premise is set, here's what happened. Based on the problem description I did a remote connection to check the issue. Installed an anti-spyware and left it running. Client called back to say the machine isn't starting. Photos sent to me show it at s boot menu. Instructed client on getting in the BIOS. Hard drive not recognized.

    Collected the laptop and took out the drive. This was one where you have to remove the motherboard to get to the hard drive. Tedious. Checked the drive externally and it's dead. Doesn't spin up or anything.

    While I know this happens, the strange part for me is I did a SMART test on the drive when I originally did the remote connection. There were no errors. Due to the cost of a new drive I didn't charge for any of the work done. I told the client though that due to how tedious/difficult it was to reach the drive, I'd have to bill going forward.

    The state now is that the client seems upset with me. Basically stating that the reason the drive died is because of the scan and my remote connection. Based on the client's knowledge I have no idea how to convince them otherwise. All they're saying is it would have been fine if it died on them without my connecting and how much they regret answering my follow up mail from the ticket system.

    Now I can't educate the client any more than I've done. Matter of fact, and ironically, my own system died this morning. I shut it down and was booting back up to send an email and it won't turn on. I explained all of that and it makes no difference to the client.

    At this point I plan to put a loaner drive in the laptop until they purchase a replacement - just to satisfy the customer service side. But I'm rather wary of the client as a result.

    What I'd like is some feedback from the tech community on your thoughts and how you'd handle it. I know that I'm not obligated to assist with a loaner drive, but it's part of my customer service based on the client relationship, history and conditions under which the failure may have taken place. And the thing that I find most strange is the sudden failure of the drive instead of a gradual decline. Anyways. Waiting on the replies to see how the community would deal with it. Thanks in advance.
    Knowing the solution doesn't mean knowing the method. Yet answering correctly and regurgitation are considered "learning" and "knowledge".

  2. #2
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    Drive failure can happen without notice or warning but in this case it appears that the first sign was it not being recognized to boot. Could also be a hardware issue, possibly even with the mobo. The drive could have been “pushed it over the edge” by the SMART test, but that’s no real fault of yours since you needed to do a test.

    Did the loaner drive work?
    Did the bad drive work with another machine?
    Team Leader
    TechJamaica.com

  3. #3
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    I know its not anyone's fault and I should be unconcerned. But work ethics and morals compel me to try and satisfy even unreasonable clients.

    The drive is dead - no spin up when placed in a dock. A replacement PCB would be the first step, but the attitude of the client makes me not want to push for cheaper solutions. TredLabs is where I've suggested.

    *EDIT*
    So I've lost this client. I think. I'm upset about it but I'll get over it. The client refused the offer for a temporary drive replacement until they got their own. After hearing that I even offered to pay part of the cost to have them get a second opinion - they weren't interested. I'm very disappointed, but it just helps in showing the different types of clients you may encounter. That was very unreasonable in my eyes. I hope they at least ask me before going to some of the stores around - quite a few of them are known in the repair circles to cannibalize parts or rip off clients. But...........that's it.

    I'll leave the thread open to get feedback. Would like to see other views.
    Last edited by khat17; Aug 20, 2019 at 05:24 PM.

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    I think you went above and beyond, but there's no pleasing this client. You can't win them all.
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    I agree with Chris. You have done more than you can with this client. It sucks to lose a client when you care about your job. I tell persons all the while that man made stuff can fail all the while but there is only so much you can explain.
    I can only hope that in the the client realize in the future that they had a very good agent.
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    Nothing can be done in this respect. Knowledge can shared but if the client will not accept it then you will have to move on.

    The lesson for all (though we all know it) is that drives will fail whether they are mechanical or solid state and a backup is your only friend. To protect yourself in the future you can get a large drive and do a backup before any diagnosis so that when the inevitable occurs you can save the client from themselves or Murphy.

    Truly sorry about your situation and possible financial and possible reputation loss as a result of nothing of your own doing. Just live and learn. A client like that is the kind you don't want in the first place as they are not willing to take the advise of their trusted partner.

  7. #7
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    Take it a learning experience, get things right with that client (absorb the cost if you must), once the client is satisfied - fire the client and move on.
    1.8 Ghz Pentium 4 (OC'd.) / Intel P4 (478) Motherboard / 800MHz DDR / 256 Mb DDR RAM / 40GB Seagate / RIVA TNT2 Pro 32MB / 24X12X24 Sony CDRW+ / 18" View Sonic CRT / Windows ME Yes it will play Doom... i plan on trying Crysis 3 one of these days.

  8. #8
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    firstly; you cannot satisfy every client - count it as a loss and be less quick to make such changes to a clients computer. Laptops on a whole suck. Secondly Antivirus software does overwork hard drives and mess with operating seems to the point where it in itself is a virus. I keep saying it to people but they don't listen; AUTO UPDATING SOFTWARE IS A PERSONAL SECURITY RISK and should be discouraged whenever possible. It creates a fragile ecosystem where random **** will happen because something changed and no one will know what exactly it is.

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