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Thread: FLOW To Deliver Faster Internet But Mum on Timeline

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by psilos View Post
    HFC is basically already FTTN, as the fibre goes to their optical nodes and its COAX to your yard for the last mile. It has far more bandwidth available that e copper phone lines they are wringing out to provide VDSL.
    The main difference AFAIK is shared bandwidth on HFC versus "dedicated" bandwidth on FTTN. This is particularly seen in highly populated areas where people (mostly students) torrent a lot and regular users suffer greatly. While the DOCSIS 3x helps a bit, they need to actually implement their FUP and throttle some of those users in areas where it adversely affects others.

    What I'm really interested in - but have no idea IF or WHEN it will get to us - is FTTH. Jamaica doesn't have the proper infrastructure for that. Just look at what happens with the current rains.
    Knowing the solution doesn't mean knowing the method. Yet answering correctly and regurgitation are considered "learning" and "knowledge".

  2. #42
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    You are right about the shared part of HFC. Both HFC and FTTN use fibre nodes but all bandwidth on the connections (COAX) leaving the node for HFC are shared where as the copper (phone lines) is "dedicated" between the node and each individual house. Of course everything is shared again when leaving the node back to the ISP so there will always been some contention at some point in the network. FUPs are unfortunately important from ISP perspective.

    Quote Originally Posted by khat17 View Post
    ...What I'm really interested in - but have no idea IF or WHEN it will get to us - is FTTH. Jamaica doesn't have the proper infrastructure for that. Just look at what happens with the current rains.
    Digicel Play is FTTH. I am guessing you meant "us" in terms of where you are physically located.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by psilos View Post
    You are right about the shared part of HFC. Both HFC and FTTN use fibre nodes but all bandwidth on the connections (COAX) leaving the node for HFC are shared where as the copper (phone lines) is "dedicated" between the node and each individual house. Of course everything is shared again when leaving the node back to the ISP so there will always been some contention at some point in the network. FUPs are unfortunately important from ISP perspective.



    Digicel Play is FTTH. I am guessing you meant "us" in terms of where you are physically located.
    FTTH islandwide doesn't seem like a feasible proposition. If you look at the most popular FTTH deployments worldwide like Verizon FiOS for instance, it can only be found in dense geographies like the 5 boroughs of New York City, across the Hudson in New Jersey (which is home to Verizon HQ - or Bell Atlantic for those old enough to remember that), Philadelphia, D.C., Northern Virginia and as soon, Boston. FiOS is only really available in the Northeast of the US and its deployment was actually subsidized by the US Govt., yet it only managed to reach 19 million homes (15.2% of homes in the US). Another key point to note is that within these dense geographies are some pretty high wealth customers who can more than afford to shell out X dollars a month for 940 Mbit/s down and 880 Mbit/s up (which is only available in select areas with each city). What I'm trying to say is that islandwide FTTH is untenable especially for a country wherein customers have little impetus to pay bills on time or even afford & necessitate the utility of gigabit fibre internet. For those that can, to mitigate against the vast expanse the network would have to traverse, HFC seems like a far more sustainable proposition and is the reason why companies like Comcast are so pervasive in the US, because of their HFC networks. Even more tenable is VDSL2+, ADSL2+ and simple ADSL which Verizon, AT&T and others still offer in areas not in a fibre or HFC area.

    Despite this, companies like Liberty Global have made their intent known in regards to moving HFC networks to gigabit capable FTTH networks in the future. I anticipate this happening in places like Kingston, perhaps when Digicel thinks of some new exciting new proposition.
    Last edited by Brandysull; May 18, 2017 at 04:24 AM.

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