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View Full Version : whats the outgoin mail server for LIME??



Lanza
July 8, 2010, 01:09 PM
wats the outgoin mail server for cable n wireless??

rvjimmy
July 8, 2010, 06:57 PM
i think it would be

mail.cwjamaica.com

you setting up outlook express i dont work for C W so i'm not 100% exact but most of the time it would be that. CW is not reliable as in long term email address so i would not use it cause if you change company, move or disconnect your service u loose all your contact,

POP3 - mail.cwjamaica.com
SMTP - mail.cwjamaica.com

Lanza
July 9, 2010, 12:31 PM
yea man i know alla that but is not outlook i using is thunderbird. i can receive but i cant send out any emails. is it possible to get it to work or i might just have to switch to a new address.

lojikal
July 9, 2010, 12:46 PM
i dont think that would make a difference which client you are using. the settings should be the same.
POP3 - mail.cwjamaica.com
SMTP - mail.cwjamaica.com

Click on the Outgoing Server tab and check the box My outgoing server (SMTP) requires authentication. Use same settings as my incoming mail server and click OK to save the settings

Click finish to end session.

Hope this helps

Arch_Angel
July 9, 2010, 01:04 PM
Hmm, I just went to try and send an email from my email address and run into an error about the certificate being incorrect. I clicked to temporarily accept it, but it still didn't go through. I tried sending it again after a few mins and it went through this time.

Here are my settings in thunderbird:
http://img64.imageshack.us/img64/7458/limeemailsettings.png
http://img686.imageshack.us/img686/4721/limeemailsettings2.png

ramesh
July 9, 2010, 01:19 PM
Is your username set to be:

<account_name>@cwjamaica.com

You may also have to authorise outgoing mail using your email address and passowrd.

Lanza
July 9, 2010, 04:17 PM
Hmm, I just went to try and send an email from my email address and run into an error about the certificate being incorrect. I clicked to temporarily accept it, but it still didn't go through. I tried sending it again after a few mins and it went through this time.

Here are my settings in thunderbird:
http://img64.imageshack.us/img64/7458/limeemailsettings.png
http://img686.imageshack.us/img686/4721/limeemailsettings2.png

wow will definately try this out thanx


Is your username set to be:

<account_name>@cwjamaica.com

You may also have to authorise outgoing mail using your email address and passowrd.

oooh ok ill check it out n let u guys know wats up.

jamrock
July 9, 2010, 08:40 PM
yea man i know alla that but is not outlook i using is thunderbird. i can receive but i cant send out any emails. is it possible to get it to work or i might just have to switch to a new address.

Do you have a LIME modem at the location from which the mails are being sent?

Lanza
July 10, 2010, 12:33 AM
Do you have a LIME modem at the location from which the mails are being sent?


nah its a laptop so u know i goin be moving around n ting. arch_angel the smtp thing mail.cwjamaica dont work. but i goin try change up some other things n see

Arch_Angel
July 10, 2010, 12:40 AM
nah its a laptop so u know i goin be moving around n ting. arch_angel the smtp thing mail.cwjamaica dont work. but i goin try change up some other things n seeDo you get an error?

I am using Lime's DSL.

jamrock
July 10, 2010, 05:35 AM
nah its a laptop so u know i goin be moving around n ting. arch_angel the smtp thing mail.cwjamaica dont work. but i goin try change up some other things n see

ISP's restrict people from sending mail through their network from addresses on other domains. To send mail via LIME from another ISP's network try the following:

Description: LIME
Server name: mail.cwjamaica.com
Port: 125
Security and administration: Tick username and password
Username: lanza
Use secure authentication: Untick
Connection security: None

Note that you are logging into a server so the username must be lanza, not lanza@cwjamaica.com.

Sorry if this seems like a stupid question. Do you have an email account with LIME?

Arch_Angel
July 10, 2010, 11:39 AM
ISP's restrict people from sending mail through their network from addresses on other domains. To send mail via LIME from another ISP's network try the following:

Description: LIME
Server name: mail.cwjamaica.com
Port: 125
Security and administration: Tick username and password
Username: lanza
Use secure authentication: Untick
Connection security: None

Note that you are logging into a server so the username must be lanza, not lanza@cwjamaica.com.

Sorry if this seems like a stupid question. Do you have an email account with LIME?I have a Logic One cable internet and tried sending an email using the same LIME settings I posted earlier. It wouldn't connect to the SMTP server at all. Changed the port to 125, and the email went through.

Also, doesn't LIME require that you check your email before you send an email? I know some servers do this to authenticate you on the server. They give you a few mins windows to send an email after you check for your email.

jamrock
July 10, 2010, 01:09 PM
Also, doesn't LIME require that you check your email before you send an email? I know some servers do this to authenticate you on the server. They give you a few mins windows to send an email after you check for your email.

Not exactly.

There are two main ways that mail servers authenticate users re: the sending of mail.

POP-before-SMTP or IMAP-before-SMTP

SMTP-AUTH

POP-before-SMTP authorization or IMAP-before-SMTP authorization allows the user to send mail after he has used his username and password to read his mail.

In order to send mail, a user must first read his mail. Once he authenticates, the server stores the i.p. address from which the authentication originates for a limited time. During that time, that i.p. address is allowed to send mail via the mail server.

Once the time has been exceeded, the user must authenticate (check his mail) again before being allowed to send mail.


SMTP-AUTH requires the user to authenticate before sending mail. When he tries to send mail, a login screen appears. Once he has authenticated, the mail is allowed to pass through the mail server.

LIME uses SMTP-AUTH. You have to authenticate when checking your mail and you have to authenticate when sending mail. You can send out mail before reading your mail.


Understanding email applications is all about understanding the protocols which allow mail servers and clients to communicate.

POP refers to a configuration where the mail client pulls the mail to the workstation.

IMAP refers to a configuration where the email remains on the mail server and is read from the server.

SMTP is the simple mail transfer protocol. It is the standard that determines how mail is sent.

Arch_Angel
July 10, 2010, 01:24 PM
Not exactly.lol ok thanks. :D

Informative info. :eusa_clap

rvjimmy
July 10, 2010, 05:15 PM
get you a domain name and get you own personal email address

lanza@lanza.com

Lanza
July 12, 2010, 02:16 PM
problem solved guys thanx alot for d help. it seems the problem was the port. was 25 n jus like in the pic i changed it to 125 n all my messages goin thru perfectly.

lojikal
July 12, 2010, 10:36 PM
very informative post like so many others i did learn a few things here

carey
August 3, 2013, 02:26 PM
Don't speak ill of the dead. The dead serve purpose.

Is it wise to use username and password on smtp without ssl or some other security? That would mean clear text transfer of info.

SMTP works without username and password, right?

ramesh
August 3, 2013, 02:33 PM
SMTP works without username and password, right? Not necessarily. Read jamrock's post further up. In most cases now, SMTP servers require you to authenticate before sending to reduce spam sent by unauthorised users.

jamrock
August 4, 2013, 02:47 PM
Don't speak ill of the dead. The dead serve purpose.


OMG!!!
Lazarus come forth.
Sorry... I just had to say it.


Is it wise to use username and password on smtp without ssl or some other security? That would mean clear text transfer of info.

SMTP works without username and password, right?

Good question. You can configure email servers to use ssl or not. Public mail servers tend to be configured without ssl. So yes, usernames, passwords, etc. are sent in clear text. They can therefore be read by anyone who takes the time to use a packet sniffer.

Ever wonder how come people break into other people's email accounts and find those nude pictures? They sit in Starbucks with a packet sniffer.

People usually use smtp and pop3 over ssl on corporate email networks. This is especially important since people often use the network logon credentials as their email credentials.

carey
August 4, 2013, 04:41 PM
Don't need wireless. It should be possible to do it for the same reason I know the mail server runs on Solaris 10.

Why can't I send encrypted mail using LIME? I can send every other mail, but signed or encrypted. They even blacklist smtp.cwjamaica.com.

jamrock
August 4, 2013, 05:43 PM
Typically, encrypted communications over a computer network use ssl. Packets travel from one computer to another. With ssl, both computers agree on a method of encryption, then send the data over the encrypted link.

Ssl encryption normally uses certificates. Both the sender and the receiver need to have certificates which determine how the data is encrypted. On a LAN, the administrator has control over the servers and the clients. He can create certificates and distribute them to all the machines on the network. That way, the machines can use the certificates to organize encryption on both ends of the data exchange.

LIME would need to create a private certificate and a public certificate. They would need to send you the public certificate. You would use the public certificate to encrypt the message and their server would use the private certificate to decrypt the message.

So basically, unless LIME decides to set up encryption on their mail server and send their public certificate to the people who use their mail service, you will not be able to send encrypted mail via their server.

This is a simplified explanation. There are a few variations re: how this could work.

Microsoft has a very good article explaining ssl and encryption. BTW, ssl works pretty much the same on Linux/Unix and Windows.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb727098.aspx

Another option is for LIME to have a company like Verisign certify their certificates. Either way, the process would need to start with LIME and the creation of a some ssl certificates.

carey
August 4, 2013, 11:29 PM
Typically, encrypted communications over a computer network use ssl. Packets travel from one computer to another. With ssl, both computers agree on a method of encryption, then send the data over the encrypted link.

Ssl encryption normally uses certificates. Both the sender and the receiver need to have certificates which determine how the data is encrypted. On a LAN, the administrator has control over the servers and the clients. He can create certificates and distribute them to all the machines on the network. That way, the machines can use the certificates to organize encryption on both ends of the data exchange.

LIME would need to create a private certificate and a public certificate. They would need to send you the public certificate. You would use the public certificate to encrypt the message and their server would use the private certificate to decrypt the message.

So basically, unless LIME decides to set up encryption on their mail server and send their public certificate to the people who use their mail service, you will not be able to send encrypted mail via their server.

This is a simplified explanation. There are a few variations re: how this could work.

Microsoft has a very good article explaining ssl and encryption. BTW, ssl works pretty much the same on Linux/Unix and Windows.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb727098.aspx

Another option is for LIME to have a company like Verisign certify their certificates. Either way, the process would need to start with LIME and the creation of a some ssl certificates.

Explanation is like the book says. But it is still wrong. With the help of the lead developer of Foresight (TForsman), I have managed to figure out how GnuPG encryption works. The parts of an e-mail are the envelop, header and body. LIME as a service provider should have nothing to do with the body, just like a post office. The body is where the encryption occurs with PGP/GPG. It would be pointless if they were in control of our certificates when the only people who should be seeing messages are the sender and recipient. I am about to try setting up the same thing with Gmail. So, I can send mail knowing that it is going to be hard for someone to see what I sent.

Here is my id: 0xE5AD5F8C. Going to work on it some more.

jamrock
August 6, 2013, 09:19 AM
Is it wise to use username and password on smtp without ssl or some other security? That would mean clear text transfer of info.


The parts of an e-mail are the envelop, header and body. LIME as a service provider should have nothing to do with the body, just like a post office. The body is where the encryption occurs with PGP/GPG

Do you want to encrypt the username and password? Do you want to encrypt the content of the email? These are two different things.

The configuration of your mail client will achieve the first. This controls how you connect to and authenticate with the mail server. This requires the generation of ssl certificates by the service provider.


The body is where the encryption occurs with PGP/GPG. It would be pointless if they were in control of our certificates when the only people who should be seeing messages are the sender and recipient. I am about to try setting up the same thing with Gmail. So, I can send mail knowing that it is going to be hard for someone to see what I sent.

This sounds as if you want to encrypt the content of the mail. Typically you would encrypt the content with a certificate and the receiver would use a corresponding certificate to decrypt it. With this approach the encryption and decryption takes place between the sender and the receiver of the mail. It is independent of the mail server.

If you use ssl/tls with the latter approach, ssl certificates will still be required.

Interesting discussion.

carey
August 6, 2013, 09:36 AM
Do you want to encrypt the username and password? Do you want to encrypt the content of the email? These are two different things.

The configuration of your mail client will achieve the first. This controls how you connect to and authenticate with the mail server. This requires the generation of ssl certificates by the service provider.



This sounds as if you want to encrypt the content of the mail. Typically you would encrypt the content with a certificate and the receiver would use a corresponding certificate to decrypt it. With this approach the encryption and decryption takes place between the sender and the receiver of the mail. It is independent of the mail server.

If you use ssl/tls with the latter approach, ssl certificates will still be required.

Interesting discussion.
I don't care about the username. Care about the password. Yes, on email content. The main issue is LIME seemed to not be allowing me to send encrypted mail. Also, their SMTP works better without authentication, hence LIME domain seems to be getting blacklisted. I don't want to talk about their SMTP further. Someone knowledgeable needs to notify them. I am going to test again shortly if my client still can't send encrypted mail. If it works then I was definitely doing something stupid. If it does not, then LIME's Solaris 10 mail server is being used as a 'dragnet'.

Update: I can send encrypted mail now. So, I was doing something stupid. I also disabled authentication on SMTP till LIME fixes it.

jamrock
August 6, 2013, 10:01 AM
Update: I can send encrypted mail now. So, I was doing something stupid.

What approach did you take? Has the receiver been able to decrypt the mail?

I really haven't had a problem with LIME's email service. What makes you think their domain is getting blacklisted?

carey
August 6, 2013, 10:36 AM
What approach did you take? Has the receiver been able to decrypt the mail?Installed GPG4Win and a good FOSS mail client. I sent the mail to myself in various accounts, without a public key. So, I couldn't decrypt it. But, it is not showing so ...


I really haven't had a problem with LIME's email service. What makes you think their domain is getting blacklisted?Analysis by mxtoolbox, http://mxtoolbox.com/SuperTool.aspx?action=smtp:smtp.cwjamaica.com

My mistake. My ip addy is blacklisted, not LIME SMTP. Wow, 3 dirty ip addresses in a row! Time to change it again.

jamrock
August 6, 2013, 11:03 AM
Installed GPG4Win and a good FOSS mail client. I sent the mail to myself in various accounts, without a public key. So, I couldn't decrypt it. But, it is not showing so ...

This is one of the main challenges facing each organization implementing public key infrastructure (PKI). How do you securely transmit public keys so that only the intended recipients have access to them? Windows has a nice feature for transmitting certificates when you use Active Directory Certificate Services. Others use a service like Verisign.

It is one thing to be able to send encrypted mail. It is another thing for the recipients to be able to read it.


My mistake. My ip addy is blacklisted, not LIME SMTP. Wow, 3 dirty ip addresses in a row! Time to change it again.
I figured that was the issue. This is an important reason why companies purchase fixed ip addresses from their isp.

Let me know how things progress. It took me a while to understand PKI. It is one of the more complex topics in networking.

carey
August 6, 2013, 12:35 PM
This is one of the main challenges facing each organization implementing public key infrastructure (PKI). How do you securely transmit public keys so that only the intended recipients have access to them? Windows has a nice feature for transmitting certificates when you use Active Directory Certificate Services. Others use a service like Verisign.

Sharing Secret Keys

NOTE!: the following use cases indicate why the secret-key import/export commands exist, or at least a couple ideas of what you could do with them. HOWEVER, there's some logistics required for sharing that secret-key. How do you get it from one computer to another? I guess encrypting it and sending it by email would probably be ok, but I wouldn't send it unencrypted with email, that'd be DANGEROUS.

Use Case *.1 : Mentioned above were the commands for exporting and importing secret keys, and I want to explain one reason of why maybe you'd want to do this. Basically if you want one key-pair for all of your computers (assuming you have multiple computers), then this allows you export that key-pair from the original computer and import it to your other computers.

Use Case *.2 : Mentioned above were the commands for exporting and importing secret keys, and I want to explain one reason of why maybe you'd want to do this. Basically, if you belonged to a group, and wanted to create a single key-pair for that group, one person would create the key-pair, then export the public and private keys, give them to the other members of the group, and they would all import that key-pair. Then a member of the group or someone outside could use the group public key, encrypt the message and/or data, and send it to members of the group, and all of them would be able to access the message and/or data. Basically you could create a simplified system where only one public key was needed to send encrypted stuffs to muliple recipients.--http://irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/~lockhart/gpg/gpg-cs.html

It is one thing to be able to send encrypted mail. It is another thing for the recipients to be able to read it.


I figured that was the issue. This is an important reason why companies purchase fixed ip addresses from their isp.

Let me know how things progress. It took me a while to understand PKI. It is one of the more complex topics in networking.
Just read http://support.microsoft.com/kb/246071. I am not jumping to that point yet. Working on a small population trust first. Like people who I send sensitive messages to. My plan is once we have verified each others identity through varied means, then we exchange public keys. Otherwise, hkp://keys.gnupg.net has my ID.

Update: apparently you should make a primary key which will be used to validate your subkeys. That key should be kept offline, in every sense of the word. The subkeys should be constructed according to the purpose they serve: signing files, encrypting files, spare. I am not going make over my keys yet. Going to practise first.